Tag Archive for digital

FullTimeDEVILS

FullTimeDEVILS channel art

One of our current producing projects is FullTimeDEVILS, Fremantle Media Interactive’s YouTube channel for Manchester United fans.  Football vlogging is fairly new on YouTube (as indeed is football on YouTube as a whole), but the success of channels such as The Redmen TV and ArsenalFan TV demonstrates that there is a market for fan-centric content, certainly for clubs with large fanbases.  The challenge for channels such as this is how to create engaging content without any official assets; if you’re doing things by the book, match footage, Premier League images and even club badges are all off limits.  Another hurdle to overcome is the fact that unlike most channels on YouTube, it doesn’t always pay to collaborate with channels in the same area; we’ve worked with both The Redmen TV and Arsenal Fan TV and although it’s interesting to have an opposition fan’s perspective on matters, the simple fact is that a Liverpool fan isn’t going to subscribe to a Manchester United channel.  This said, after only 6 months we’re now firmly established within the YouTube/football community, and can claim to be the largest Manchester United fan channel on the platform.

We’ll be writing in more depth about YouTube as the site finds its feet again, but in the meantime don’t hesitate to leave a comment or drop us a line if you have any YouTube-related enquiries.

Copa90

Copa90 icon

 

In 2012 we were proud to help launch Copa90, one of the first European funded ‘Original’ channels on YouTube.  Produced out of Bigballs Films, Copa is a youth-oriented football channel aiming to celebrate the beautiful game from a fresh angle, featuring entertainment formats, short-form documentaries, gaming strands and more.  Working with Bigballs for the first few months of the project, Resolution Square helped run the production team and was central in the development of several early formats.  A year on and Copa has established itself as one of the major players within the digital football community and is certainly a channel to watch for the future.

Sports Tonight Live

Sports Tonight Live logo

Sports Tonight Live was Kelvin Mackenzie’s foray into digital sports broadcasting.  I went intending to freelance as a day producer but on my first day was thrown into the channel manager’s hotseat and asked to launch a new, nightly live broadcast within 3 weeks…with a team of keen graduates I’d never met and a radio presenter who had never worked on camera.  A long story, and a real challenge!

I shot: Gareth Edwards, Jonathan Davies and Shane Williams

Back in January I was privileged to meet and shoot three generations of Welsh rugby icons: Gareth Edwards, Jonathan Davies and Shane Williams. I wouldn’t claim to be the world’s biggest rugby fan but I know enough to appreciate the quality of the lineup; it’s like getting Sir Bobby Charlton, Kevin Keegan and David Beckham around a table. Old Soccer AM mucker Robbie Knox and I were on hand to record the interview for the Jaguar Academy of Sport, who wanted to get the guys together to discuss how rugby has changed over the generations. Because of the timing of their careers it made for some fascinating insights; Edwards’ era was staunchly amateur, Davies played both as an amateur and professional, famously also swapping codes, and Williams has enjoyed the trappings of the modern game for the majority of his career. The way the game has progressed is epitomised in the way Wales have prepared for internationals over the years; in the 70′s they’d meet up on a Friday night for what seemed to amount to a team talk and a pint, and nowadays players have their training, nutrition, weight and even sleep monitored 7 days or so in advance of a big match. From my point of view it was also interesting to hear how modern media has affected the game and the ‘celebrity’ status of today’s players, although we probably would have heard a bit more about that had Gavin Henson been there…

Jaguar wanted a short edit of the group interview plus some more individual profiles relating to players’ highlights, heroes etc, plus a final video on the current state of Welsh rugby.

You can watch the group interview here:

And you’ll find the individual pieces on the Jaguar YouTube account.

Robbie and I shot on Sony EX1/3; location was the Miskin Manor outside Cardiff. Rather lovely, actually, and certainly rather more lovely than the Legacy Cardiff International where we stayed. If you’re thinking of staying there, don’t. It might encourage you to throw yourself onto the fast lane of the M4 just outside the window.

I shot: Matt Le Tissier (again)

Matt Le Tiss is one of my favourite footballers. Pure class on the pitch in his day, now pure gent off it. I had the good fortune to meet him a couple of times back in the Soccer AM days and our paths have now crossed twice more in the past year, first for an 888 video pre-World Cup, and back in February for an FATV shoot. Partly due to his experience on the box and undoubtedly equally because he’s generally a top bloke, you know that when you’ve got a shoot with him, he’ll give you exactly what you need without any fuss.

We were at Warsash Wasps FC, regional winners of the FA Charter Standard Development Club award last year, to help launch this year’s nomination process for the FA Community Awards http://www.thefa.com/yourgame and after a tour of the (very impressive) club he gave me an interview on his early days, influences and memories in football:

While we were there I picked up a few more bits with him including his fantasy 5-a-side team (edited by FATV):

It was the first outing for my new rig including my new Canon 70-200mm F4 IS lens which was pretty essential for the football action, and all in all I was pretty pleased with the result. Part of the problem with filming mostly ‘run and gun’, reality style pieces is that it’s tough to get those perfect shots and there’s always a degree of compromise but I think the key is to have a plan. Yes, 90% of the time that plan will change with the weather, the schedule and usually the talent, but a plan is a good place to start!

Multi skilling; the future?

I got into tv production way back when because I wanted to be creative. I’m pretty sure it was Chris Evans’ antics on The Big Breakfast which planted the seed although for a few years after I harboured some sort of pretence that I was going to become the next big theatre director by ripping people’s tickets at the London Palladium. But when I eventually jumped into tv I had my career plan worked out: 5 years in the ranks, then producing, then running my own show, running an independent production company and eventually running the BBC.

I’ve always been interested in learning new skills (sometimes at the expense of sense, like my ill-fated and somewhat ridiculous attempt to pick up Esperanto), so the frenetic pace of early life at Soccer AM suited me. Whether it was because we were a small team or because Sky Sports always seemed to encourage a ‘sink or swim’ mentality, we were all called upon to do whatever it took to get the show to air on a Saturday. So we’d be calling up fans one minute, bands the next, sitting in on goal edits, chucking in a voiceover, writing a shoddy gag or knocking up a prop for Sheephead’s flea circus. As the years went by and I moved up the ladder I made less flea circuses and spent most of my time doing producery stuff like writing, checking and sitting in the gallery, but my point in all this is that most of us in the team could quite rightly call themselves multi-skilled. Unlike many productions we didn’t have the luxury of specialised archive researchers, scriptwriters or guest bookers; we all had to muck in and get the job done.

When some of us left to start Channelbee, part of the appeal for me was that we’d need to become even more diverse to survive. We’d all directed shoots and sat in on edits but we hadn’t actually used the cameras or pushed the buttons, and we certainly knew nothing about codecs, bitrates and HTML. Two years on and most of us left as half-decent self-shooting, self-editing tv and digital producers with a pretty good grounding in social media. That’s all well and good; it’s clear that with digital convergence and cost-cutting impacting every budget, production staff are going to need more than a basic grasp of technology to survive. The reason I’ve been able to go it alone rather than sitting waiting for the tv jobs to come in is because I’ve thrown myself into the learning experience, and I’m enjoying shooting in particular far more than I ever thought I would. I also believe that from a personal point of view, sitting inbetween ‘traditional’ tv and digital production is going to be useful; I’m already picking up work because of that particular experience.

There is another side to the story, however, and it’s one which worries me in quieter moments. The more production staff become all-singing, all-dancing Jacks of most trades, the less we encourage the genuine craftsmen who made our media industry one of the strongest in the world. If we’re expected to pick up a new skill every six months, what chance do we have to become the very best in just one discipline? And the more multi-skilled content producers there are, the less the rate clients/employers are willing to pay which in turn begins to price genuine experts out of the market. In the last 6 months or so I’ve had at least 3 conversations with specialists in tv/film/photography who learned and mastered their crafts in the 60′s and 70′s and who now can’t either find the work or can’t work for the rates offered. Add to this the fact that equipment needed to produce content is more accessible and affordable than ever (DSLR technology in particular has brought film-making within the pocket of most of us) and the issue becomes even more complex. I agree with the argument that reducing the barriers to production in this way expands the talent pool and therefore ultimately helps the industry, but I just wonder where we’ll be in 20 years’ time if the whole industry is self-taught and multi-skilled.

Perhaps the responsibility lies with broadcasters/studios etc who could do their bit to safeguard the future by offering on the job training, but I’m not holding my breath. The only training I had in 8 years at Sky was Health/Safety and a day on team leading. I pushed for camera and edit training at Channelbee (which, thankfully, was forthcoming) and I’ve since funded some out of my own pocket.

There’s no real answer to this and as you’ll probably gather I’m not quite sure where I stand; I’m just happy to be surfing the wave right now in order to keep my own head above water, but if you’ve got an opinion, especially if you’re involved in the industry, I’d love to hear it.

Apple updates iTunes, IOS, Apple TV, iPod, Chris Martin and…Ping

A vaguely considered review of the new Apple updates announced by Steve Jobs minutes ago follows…apologies for the lack of pictures but I’m sure you know what an iPhone looks like.

So I was babysitting today and as I promised myself I’d keep up with all things techie from now on, I attempted to juggle following the update live on my iPhone with In the Night Garden, bath, book and bed.  Martha (18 months) is now fully au fait with the full product range but is a little dubious as to their new foray into social networking.  More on that in a bit; just don’t tell the mrs that I wasn’t paying full attention to the small person.

First thing to note is that the whole thing was streamed live, iPhone compatible, naturally, which is always impressive.  If Apple do one thing very well, it’s pulling the collective geek-strings of the world to create a huge buzz around their new product launches.  Less impressive was the lack of a jump forward button in the timeline so even though I was running a few minutes behind live (Special Agent Oso was on so I couldn’t jump on it straight way) I couldn’t skip the boring bits (no, not Chris Martin, the ads and stuff).

So…the updates.  Gadget reviews aren’t really my thing even though I’m as prone as anyone to new stuff so I’ll keep this brief:  iPods are getting smaller.  Really small, and the Nano is now touch screen.  Presumably surgeons and concert pianists will be fine picking the album they want but the rest of us might struggle.  Oh and the iPod touch is getting even thinnner.  That was one announcement which the assembled audience didn’t bother whooping.  Also, iPhones are getting an update next week which should fix bugs (which is as close to an admittance of fault as you’ll ever get from Apple) and the new iOS 4.1 includes HDR (‘High Dynamic Range’) photo capability.  This latter update sounds interesting although I’m dubious as to how much you can improve your photos when your source is the pretty poor iPhone camera.  It apparently takes 3 photos with 3 different exposures, merges them to collate the ‘best’ image and offers you that as an alternative to your original.  Also included in the free update is GameCenter which apart from being incorrectly spelt opens up your games to live multi-player gameplay.  Beyond that, 4.2 will roll out in November and will mainly concentrate on the iPad, offering wireless printing and AirPlay, an updated version of AirTunes, a wireless music streaming service.

More interesting to me was the news that they’re giving Apple TV another aggressive push.  Accepting that it has never really taken off, Jobs and co and offering the new, 1/4 size box at $99 (or £99 over here, apparently).  It’ll offer HD, streaming content for rental from several major U.S. networks (TV shows for 99c) and first run movies for $4.99 including compatibility with NetFlix.  YouTube will also be supported although apparently still no support for the iPlayer.  At that price it’s going to tempt a whole new market into the possibilities of streaming media on demand.

For me, by far the most exciting news of the day was iTunes v10.  No, not the new icon, the announcement of Ping, Apple’s new social network.  I say ‘exciting’, as that’s with my digital head on, but at the same time I’m really wound up by it.  In a nutshell, it’s a social network run through iTunes where you can connect with friends or artists on a musical level, so share recommendations, leave messages, find out about gigs etc etc.  Fine; I get that.  It’s like…Facebook for music.  Sort of like…MySpace.  What??  Haven’t we been here before?  It’s a new social network to belong to which focuses on one subject (music) and which has no apparent links with the outside world.  Oh, and you have to do it all on iTunes which for all Apple’s worth is clunky at best in my opinion.  Someone on my Twitter feed just said it was like being on a social network in a jail.  I may be wrong; they may open up the API to allow it to link to other social networks but I’m doubting that.  I’ve got a feeling this is Apple’s attempt to suppress the might of Facebook and to a lesser extent, Twitter.  In the spirit of research and digital open-mindedness I’m going to give it a go (apparently the download is available today but not yet, apparently), but if I’ve got to do it through iTunes, and if I can only use it to talk about music, it’s not going to win me over as much as a thinner iPod might.

The Next Big Thing: Facebook Places

Another first in a series, this one’s called ‘The Next Big Thing’ because if you’re even vaguely into your digital media you’ll know how we’re constantly bombarded with new technology which we’re expected not only to embrace but also master.  I love it; part of the reason I’m doing this is because I’m excited by it all, and I’ve learned not to fear change, unlike some people I used to work with who will remain nameless.

Joe Sheephead Worsley fears change

I’m still not naming him.

Change is good.  And once you accept that you don’t have to master every new innovation and you don’t have to add every new app, it can be liberating.

So yeah, Facebook Places; last week’s Next Big Thing (I have been busy you know), or for those who don’t like change but who will remain nameless, ‘not another thing I have to get my head around; why can’t we just talk to people like we used to?’  The world’s tech bloggers have been hard at work debating the pros and cons of the social networking giant’s massive step onto the geolocation map since the launch a few days ago.  For my two penn’orth, I’m excited by it.  I’ve been reading that geolocation is the next big thing for a year or so and I love the idea of the likes of Foursquare and Gowalla, but until they pick up significant traction over here, they’re pretty limited in what they’re going to offer.  If none of my mates are telling me where they are (or maybe there’s a different reason for that), if brands aren’t bothering to offer check-in ‘specials’ or recommendations there’s nothing really ‘social’ about it.  I don’t particularly want to broadcast my location on Twitter for the sake of it because that’s dull for everyone else, but it would be a different matter if I had people in my network who might be interested.  I’m sure it’s a different case in USA where these sites have picked up a lot more traction, but over here at least, we have a way to go before geotagging becomes the norm.  Facebook have the clout and the members to bring this technology to the masses and I’m confident that Places will mark a new shift in the way we communicate.

If you’re not as geeky as me and you don’t know what it’s about, it’s Foursquare for lazy people.  And if you don’t know what Foursquare is about, check it out (and check-in) here.  I’m on there…here.  I have one friend which kind of makes my point about traction.  If you can’t be bothered to do the research, here’s the glossy promo video for Places.  All well and good, we get the idea, it looks nice but have you seen anything as cheesy as this since the 70′s?   The acting and directing are shocking; whoever thought that real, 21st Century tech-savvy Californians behave like this needs to take a long, hard look at themselves.  Check it out at about 30 seconds in.  Have you and your mates ever ‘hung out’ in a park like that, without attracting weird looks from Police Community Support Officers?  And how’s your baby going to benefit from using Facebook Places?

Maybe I’m being unfair.  Anyway, whatever the merit of the promo video, Facebook Places is huge news.  Perhaps predictably, many people chose to focus on the privacy aspects surrounding it but I really can’t be bothered with all that whingeing.  In fact I so can’t be bothered with it, I’m going to write a blog specifically about privacy issues when I get round to it.  And when I find the article I read in Wired about Facebook and privacy.  In a nutshell; get over it.  If you’re a member of social networking sites then I’m sorry but your privacy as you knew it no longer exists.

I was going to watch the footage of the official launch from Facebook’s HQ until I found out that it’s almost an hour long.  I did get about 10 minutes into it and gave up, but if you’ve got time to watch it, it’s here; let me know what it’s like:

Watch live streaming video from facebookinnovations at livestream.com

Aside from the launch itself, one of the interesting things to come out of this was the way the UK side of things was handled.  As usual, the technology has been rolled out in the US before we’re able to get our grubby mitts on it, so Facebook’s UK PR had a job on their hands answering initial questions from keen Facebookers over here.  These were expertly handled in a very modern and supremely efficient way on Twitter by their PR @sophysilver – and I’ve got to thank TNW’s Martin Bryant for bringing that to my attention:

The Next Web – Facebook Places story

Ok so I’ve waffled a bit but I’m new to this blogging thing.  The question is: is Facebook Places the new Facebook or the new Google Wave?  Let the debate begin…

Hello

Hello!

Thanks for stopping by.  After months of saying I was going to get around to doing this, I’ve finally done it.  It’s by no means finished; I’ve got to get a showreel up and more example videos, plenty more links and then there’s the blog to think about, but it’s a start.  As I’ve said on the ‘Resolution Who?‘ page, what I’m trying to do with this is have a half-portfolio, half blog site thing going.  So hopefully I’ll be able to pick up new work from it but I’ll also come up with interesting stuff to blog about.  I think I’ll start with splitting the blog into pesonal/random stuff and more digital media/social media-based topics but I’ll see how that goes.  I’m pretty new to blogging so if you’re not and you’ve got any tips for me it would be great if you could comment or send me an email and of course bookmark/RSS me.  I’ve already lined up a few people I want to talk about and I’ll stick something up every time I do something of interest on a job (one to follow shortly) and of course I’ll post stuff I find on Twitter or elsewhere.

To those of you who know me from Channelbee, I’ll be sticking up what videos I rescued before I left, certainly the ones I had a hand in, on my YouTube channel.  Gradually.  We may have a music issue but I’ll keep my fingers crossed on that.

I’m going to crack on but should be posting again shortly.

Neil

Hyper Island

Hyper Island

Hyper Island might well have just changed my life.  They’ve certainly changed the way I think and the way I’ll work from now on.  They are a Swedish digital training institution, but that’s not the half of it.  More on them anon.