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producer | Resolution Square

Tag Archive for producer

FullTimeDEVILS

FullTimeDEVILS channel art

One of our current producing projects is FullTimeDEVILS, Fremantle Media Interactive’s YouTube channel for Manchester United fans.  Football vlogging is fairly new on YouTube (as indeed is football on YouTube as a whole), but the success of channels such as The Redmen TV and ArsenalFan TV demonstrates that there is a market for fan-centric content, certainly for clubs with large fanbases.  The challenge for channels such as this is how to create engaging content without any official assets; if you’re doing things by the book, match footage, Premier League images and even club badges are all off limits.  Another hurdle to overcome is the fact that unlike most channels on YouTube, it doesn’t always pay to collaborate with channels in the same area; we’ve worked with both The Redmen TV and Arsenal Fan TV and although it’s interesting to have an opposition fan’s perspective on matters, the simple fact is that a Liverpool fan isn’t going to subscribe to a Manchester United channel.  This said, after only 6 months we’re now firmly established within the YouTube/football community, and can claim to be the largest Manchester United fan channel on the platform.

We’ll be writing in more depth about YouTube as the site finds its feet again, but in the meantime don’t hesitate to leave a comment or drop us a line if you have any YouTube-related enquiries.

Copa90

Copa90 icon

 

In 2012 we were proud to help launch Copa90, one of the first European funded ‘Original’ channels on YouTube.  Produced out of Bigballs Films, Copa is a youth-oriented football channel aiming to celebrate the beautiful game from a fresh angle, featuring entertainment formats, short-form documentaries, gaming strands and more.  Working with Bigballs for the first few months of the project, Resolution Square helped run the production team and was central in the development of several early formats.  A year on and Copa has established itself as one of the major players within the digital football community and is certainly a channel to watch for the future.

GoalMouth

GoalMouth logo

In spring 2011 I series produced and helped shoot ‘GoalMouth’, a 5×21 minute football magazine show for Disney XD presented by Tim Warwood and Adam Gendle.

Disney’s brief was to create a fun show for boys 8-12 which not only featured Premier League names but also helped promote the Premier League Schools Tournament.  I was asked by Sassy Films to assist with the initial pitch and development of the format, and then to write/produce the show which was a combination of archive footage, pre-recorded location packages with Premier League footballers

Footbowl on GoalMouth

mascots from Premier League and Football League

Mascot Mayhem on GoalMouth

plus action from the schools tournament and studio gags/links.

Tim and Gendle - GoalMouth

Carpello and Tim on GoalMouth

Operating with a skeleton team, I was required to take on multiple tasks including writing the script, shooting inserts, researching archive footage and booking Premier League contributors.

Multi skilling; the future?

I got into tv production way back when because I wanted to be creative. I’m pretty sure it was Chris Evans’ antics on The Big Breakfast which planted the seed although for a few years after I harboured some sort of pretence that I was going to become the next big theatre director by ripping people’s tickets at the London Palladium. But when I eventually jumped into tv I had my career plan worked out: 5 years in the ranks, then producing, then running my own show, running an independent production company and eventually running the BBC.

I’ve always been interested in learning new skills (sometimes at the expense of sense, like my ill-fated and somewhat ridiculous attempt to pick up Esperanto), so the frenetic pace of early life at Soccer AM suited me. Whether it was because we were a small team or because Sky Sports always seemed to encourage a ‘sink or swim’ mentality, we were all called upon to do whatever it took to get the show to air on a Saturday. So we’d be calling up fans one minute, bands the next, sitting in on goal edits, chucking in a voiceover, writing a shoddy gag or knocking up a prop for Sheephead’s flea circus. As the years went by and I moved up the ladder I made less flea circuses and spent most of my time doing producery stuff like writing, checking and sitting in the gallery, but my point in all this is that most of us in the team could quite rightly call themselves multi-skilled. Unlike many productions we didn’t have the luxury of specialised archive researchers, scriptwriters or guest bookers; we all had to muck in and get the job done.

When some of us left to start Channelbee, part of the appeal for me was that we’d need to become even more diverse to survive. We’d all directed shoots and sat in on edits but we hadn’t actually used the cameras or pushed the buttons, and we certainly knew nothing about codecs, bitrates and HTML. Two years on and most of us left as half-decent self-shooting, self-editing tv and digital producers with a pretty good grounding in social media. That’s all well and good; it’s clear that with digital convergence and cost-cutting impacting every budget, production staff are going to need more than a basic grasp of technology to survive. The reason I’ve been able to go it alone rather than sitting waiting for the tv jobs to come in is because I’ve thrown myself into the learning experience, and I’m enjoying shooting in particular far more than I ever thought I would. I also believe that from a personal point of view, sitting inbetween ‘traditional’ tv and digital production is going to be useful; I’m already picking up work because of that particular experience.

There is another side to the story, however, and it’s one which worries me in quieter moments. The more production staff become all-singing, all-dancing Jacks of most trades, the less we encourage the genuine craftsmen who made our media industry one of the strongest in the world. If we’re expected to pick up a new skill every six months, what chance do we have to become the very best in just one discipline? And the more multi-skilled content producers there are, the less the rate clients/employers are willing to pay which in turn begins to price genuine experts out of the market. In the last 6 months or so I’ve had at least 3 conversations with specialists in tv/film/photography who learned and mastered their crafts in the 60′s and 70′s and who now can’t either find the work or can’t work for the rates offered. Add to this the fact that equipment needed to produce content is more accessible and affordable than ever (DSLR technology in particular has brought film-making within the pocket of most of us) and the issue becomes even more complex. I agree with the argument that reducing the barriers to production in this way expands the talent pool and therefore ultimately helps the industry, but I just wonder where we’ll be in 20 years’ time if the whole industry is self-taught and multi-skilled.

Perhaps the responsibility lies with broadcasters/studios etc who could do their bit to safeguard the future by offering on the job training, but I’m not holding my breath. The only training I had in 8 years at Sky was Health/Safety and a day on team leading. I pushed for camera and edit training at Channelbee (which, thankfully, was forthcoming) and I’ve since funded some out of my own pocket.

There’s no real answer to this and as you’ll probably gather I’m not quite sure where I stand; I’m just happy to be surfing the wave right now in order to keep my own head above water, but if you’ve got an opinion, especially if you’re involved in the industry, I’d love to hear it.

My still slightly secret new project…

I think I’m able to give a bit more information about why things have been a bit quiet from my end recently but I think I still need to be a bit cagey with information so excuse me if this is a little vague!

In the summer I was approached by a production company to help them put together a pilot for a new football show. Naturally it was an honour to be asked in the first place, but also a great opportunity to do some more ‘proper tv’ work which I’ve missed since we finished doing David Beckham’s Soccer USA back in 2007. I love working in digital and the fact that I get to do all manner of different shoots with PR and brands, but it was always my intention to work across all sections of production, whether made for box or laptop. In fact I’m firmly of the belief that nowadays, where your content is played out is much less vital than the content itself, and also that every tv show should now be produced with one eye very much on its digital appeal, but that’s for a longer article to be posted on here in the future. So anyway, whilst I believe I’m in the right place by working in digital, it certainly doesn’t harm to have another tv credit on my cv and this project was too appealing to turn down.

Over the summer and autumn we put together and eventually recorded a pilot for our new show, it ran well with research groups and after consideration by the broadcaster it has been commissioned! I really don’t want to say who it’s for until the broadcaster announces it themselves, but we’ll be producing a short series to air hopefully in May time. I think I can say it’s a football show, it will be fun, and I certainly think there’s a place for it in the schedule. For me, it’s my first series producer credit which is a personal milestone and I think I’ll also be doing some shooting on it as well which is a bonus.

We are hoping to incorporate user generated clips on the show so although you don’t know much about it, if you have anything funny and football related you want us to consider, do get in touch with me either via the site or on Twitter. Obviously the usual rules apply for this content; it has to be your own work, but we can sort out the details if we like the clips. Best at this stage not to send video files themselves, more a description of what you have or a link so we can see it as we are looking for some quite specific content.

As soon as it has formally been announced I’ll tell you about the finer details of the show. It’s not going to be made for everyone, but hopefully the target audience will love it!

As far as my work is concerned, I should be able to juggle working on this and continuing with my digital/brand work so do get in touch if you need any producing/shooting/editing done!

Matt Ryder

Matt Ryder vs bouncer

‘Matt Ryder actor.com’ is an innovative, new online comedy series devised and written by actor/producer Warren Llambias (‘The Shouting Men’).  We produced a pilot which I co-produced, shot (2nd camera, under DoP Graham Fowler) and edited.  The series will follow the life of Matt Ryder, an actor/cabbie who is struggling to lose his tag of ‘the bloke from the PC World ads’ and is not at all based on the life of Warren Llambias, an actor/cabbie who appeared in lots of PC World ads.  At the heart of the project is a ground-breaking and very exciting sponsorship concept, so if you are a brand/agency and would like to hear more, do get in touch.

Matt Ryder goes for a casting